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Mule Deer

When alarmed, mule deer bound away with four feet hitting the ground together at each bound. This is called “slotting” and is different from white-tailed deer who spring from hind to front feet.

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Upland Sandpiper

Unlike most shorebirds, the Upland sandpiper is completely terrestrial, rarely associated with coastal or wetland habitats, an obligate grassland species. As a result, it is often recognized as an indicator of prairie health.

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Long-billed Curlew

Adult curlews will vigorously chase and attack potential nest or chick predators including coyotes, raptors, and people. Adults become more aggressive towards predators as their eggs begin to hatch.

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Loggerhead Shrike

Some insects and amphibians are naturally toxic to birds, so shrikes store these toxic animals on thorns or barbed wire for a day or two until the toxins have degraded and the food is safe to eat.

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Greater Prairie Chicken

In spring, males attract females by stamping their feet rapidly and making booming sounds with their air sacs. They often leap into the air with loud cackles.

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Western Meadowlark

In 1914, California grain growers initiated a study on the Western Meadowlark’s diet to determine if the bird could be designated a pest species. Although they do eat grain, Western Meadowlarks help limit crop-damaging insects.

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